Photo by Tingey Injury Law Firm on Unsplash

What you will get here

This article will provide you with a realistic, pragmatic approach and a set of tools to work with open source—just like you’re probably already doing today—but with a stronger backbone and an arsenal of answers when your legal department calls you about ”WTF no one told them you developers use other people’s code” 😅 and” how are we even supposed to sell our software now”? Sound vaguely familiar? If it does, in 10 minutes you’ll walk away with some rules of thumb, a bit of tooling, and a solid policy that you can mold into your own if needed.

Being…


This meme is just too true. What was once in vogue is now dangerous to touch. Handled carefully and competently, though, it’s of course pure gold! Data, I mean. Not asbestos. That’s only bad.

To keep this as short as the TL;DR title promises, I cut out a section that was originally slated for this article. If you like this, then you may also like my short and slightly snarky piece “Some dumb objections I have heard when discussing privacy in the context of analytics”!

Note: Being the author of this article, I represent only myself. I am not a lawyer so don’t see anything here as strictly legal advice. However, being a professional in IT and software development, this is a question I’ve dealt with for a range of clients, small and large…


Yep.

For context, I cut these to keep my forthcoming article “GDPR and overall privacy compliance, the TL;DR version” (link coming soon!) short and very TL;DR. You might want to read that one too!

Needless to say: I represent only myself and the tone is intentionally a bit snarky. I however do not apologize for opinions nor the factual statement that privacy is a dumpster fire and you and I and everyone else should do better.

Without further ado…


rGet Figmagic from https://github.com/mikaelvesavuori/figmagic

Dale Sande, Design Technologist at Alaska Airlines, makes a brilliant introduction to his talk on design systems and web components, when he shows Apple and Disney’s web sites from 1996, and says:

Teams were put together for these very small things to build. The technology wasn’t big, so you didn’t need a big team. So what I find ironic is—we all know it, you can look at this and go “oh God that’s 1996, web sites don’t look like that anymore”. But I’d argue that in a lot of places teams treat teams like you’re building web sites in 1996…


Still holds true! And yes: Humblebee is always hiring people who are dabbling with code and new technology (like ML). Source: https://twitter.com/xaprb/status/930674776317849600

There are quite a few uphill battles if you want to delve into machine learning: understanding basic statistics, probably needing to learn Python, getting to know all of the data science libraries like Pandas, having a grasp of what ML is and what it can do, and so on and so forth. While it’s all quite doable it can be pretty discouraging to jump so many hoops just to get something (at all!) done.

In this article I will present a number of AI/ML-related in-house micro projects we’ve completed at Humblebee as part of dipping our toes into ML. …


As of yet, no belief system on the planet (or beyond) will keep you safer than following a sound security plan. Image from: https://theoriginalunderground.com/products/i-want-to-believe-postcard

After having worked intensely with Amazon Web Services (AWS) for the last year, I henceforth divide my wishes into the following compartments:

  1. Things I wish I knew
  2. Things I wish I did
  3. Things I wish AWS had released

I hope you will get something in all those three categories here, with a finger pointing also to some great new additions to AWS.

The below is a compilation of things I have worked with, things I think I kind of understand, things I remember (gosh darn, all of the things I can’t pull from the dark recesses of the mind) and…


Universal Developer — The unicorn for 2020?

Situation: It’s the year 2020. Every organization scrambles to be “digital-native”, possessing the capability of moving legacy business models and procedures, often based in physical space, to always-available, globally distributed, data-driven, software-based services. They dream of wielding their futures markets (or users, or customers, or citizens…) as quickly and masterfully as a fast food chef flips burgers. Beef. Mayo, lettuce, tomato. It’s all good; next. Chanting can be heard in hallways and board rooms and secret meeting rooms in cupboards across the globe. “DevOps…DevOps…”. Somewhere in the thick incense clouds and between Enya tunes, someone wonders: “Can it really be…


Photo by Kenrick Mills on Unsplash

It’s no longer enough to only think of development as either frontend or backend work — it’s all about having a wider, more rounded competency. Right now, the public cloud is the natural spot from which to grow one’s skills as it envelopes many of the ways-of-working and types of products you will want to be proficient in, when levelling up your know-how. This mini-course will take you through some of the most important concepts and services, always ending with you setting up actual micro projects.

This course is written as part of the internal skill development initiative at Humblebee


Photo by Kenrick Mills on Unsplash

It’s no longer enough to only think of development as either frontend or backend work — it’s all about having a wider, more rounded competency. Right now, the public cloud is the natural spot from which to grow one’s skills as it envelopes many of the ways-of-working and types of products you will want to be proficient in, when levelling up your know-how. This mini-course will take you through some of the most important concepts and services, always ending with you setting up actual micro projects.

This course is written as part of the internal skill development initiative at Humblebee


Photo by Kenrick Mills on Unsplash

It’s no longer enough to only think of development as either frontend or backend work — it’s all about having a wider, more rounded competency. Right now, the public cloud is the natural spot from which to grow one’s skills as it envelopes many of the ways-of-working and types of products you will want to be proficient in, when levelling up your know-how. This mini-course will take you through some of the most important concepts and services, always ending with you setting up actual micro projects.

This course is written as part of the internal skill development initiative at Humblebee

Mikael Vesavuori

Lead Cloud Architect at Humblebee.

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